Brexit.

Innula Zenovka

Nasty Brit
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Sep 20, 2018
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The Speaker, John Bercow, has been criticised because the Government consider his frequently rulings somewhat unhelpful to them. Today's ruling (which made possible the amendment giving them only 3 days to come up with plan B if they lose the vote on the Withdrawal Agreement -- was particularly contentious. Mr Bercow does not seem overly concerned, though:

 
Sep 21, 2018
83
EU.. Germany
The Speaker, John Bercow, has been criticised because the Government consider his frequently rulings somewhat unhelpful to them. Today's ruling (which made possible the amendment giving them only 3 days to come up with plan B if they lose the vote on the Withdrawal Agreement -- was particularly contentious. Mr Bercow does not seem overly concerned, though:


great, love it
 

Kara Spengler

Queer OccupyE9 Sluni-Goon
Sep 20, 2018
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The Speaker, John Bercow, has been criticised because the Government consider his frequently rulings somewhat unhelpful to them. Today's ruling (which made possible the amendment giving them only 3 days to come up with plan B if they lose the vote on the Withdrawal Agreement -- was particularly contentious. Mr Bercow does not seem overly concerned, though:

Bearcow is having a bit of fun. :)
 

Kamilah Hauptmann

This Reality Blows
Sep 20, 2018
861
Cat Country (Can't Stop Here)
The Speaker, John Bercow, has been criticised because the Government consider his frequently rulings somewhat unhelpful to them. Today's ruling (which made possible the amendment giving them only 3 days to come up with plan B if they lose the vote on the Withdrawal Agreement -- was particularly contentious. Mr Bercow does not seem overly concerned, though:

See, if this were a Spanish speaking country he'd be required hy law to wear a luchador mask to deliver that smackdown.
 

Innula Zenovka

Nasty Brit
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Very good speech in Parliament by David Lammy MP. This, not nonsense about renegotiating a Brexit for Red Unicorns Jobs, is what Labour should be saying.

 

Tigger

not on speaking terms with the voices in my head
Sep 24, 2018
203
I've said it before and I'll say it again: David Lammy is one of a very small number of MPs who impress me.
 

Sid

Only available with a mug of coffee.
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Wow, that hit the nail exactly on the head.
Kudos for that lady.
 

Beebo Brink

Resident Grouch
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Sep 20, 2018
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Kaimi Kyomoon

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I've said it before and I'll say it again: David Lammy is one of a very small number of MPs who impress me.
I must say that based on that video clip I'm impressed with him as well.
 
Oct 6, 2018
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Hm! It's somewhat speculative, but mildly encouraging..

Article 50 set to be extended regardless of whether May wins or loses on Tuesday

Theresa May’s chances of delivering Brexit on 29 March are fading fast after senior ministers privately admitted more time is needed even if her deal wins the backing of parliament.

Senior Tories have accepted that the sheer amount of legislation parliament must pass to prepare for Brexit regardless of whether Ms May’s plans are approved, makes a withdrawal on the agreed date almost impossible.
 
Sep 22, 2018
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Right now its pretty clear that there is no path to a parliamentary majority for any "deal" but there is a majority against "no deal", this being only favored by the more rabid anti-EU types, the extremist "free marketers" that actually look at the shit-show going on across the Atlantic and would be all on-board with something similar happening in the UK.

For any sanity to break out in parliament there's pretty much only one option after May is defeated on Tuesday. By parliamentary vote article 50 must be revoked and the government charged with negotiating a deal with the EU that can pass the in the Commons. The government must also be enjoined in the same bill to refrain from invoking article 50 until such a deal has passed a Commons vote.

It's legal and would work but the odds of it going this way are pretty much zero.
 

Beebo Brink

Resident Grouch
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Sep 20, 2018
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For any sanity to break out in parliament there's pretty much only one option after May is defeated on Tuesday. By parliamentary vote article 50 must be revoked and the government charged with negotiating a deal with the EU that can pass the in the Commons.
How is this in any way sane? The deal has been negotiated. You're not going to get a different deal. From everything I've read on this forum and elsewhere, it's pretty clear that there are 3 options: this deal, no deal or stay in the EU.
 

Tigger

not on speaking terms with the voices in my head
Sep 24, 2018
203
How is this in any way sane? The deal has been negotiated. You're not going to get a different deal. From everything I've read on this forum and elsewhere, it's pretty clear that there are 3 options: this deal, no deal or stay in the EU.
Unless it's proposed to withdraw art.50 notification, then activiting it again and hoping to start the negotiation process from scratch. But I don't think the EU will play that game, it could lead to an infinite cycle of activating and withdrawing notification until the government gets 'the right deal'
 
Sep 21, 2018
83
EU.. Germany


I also already felt little bit sorry for Th.May. But the lady here did remind me what Theresa May herself has contributed as a secretary and as PM to create this standoff, to create this sore state of the british society and political situation
 

Innula Zenovka

Nasty Brit
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By parliamentary vote article 50 must be revoked and the government charged with negotiating a deal with the EU that can pass the in the Commons. The government must also be enjoined in the same bill to refrain from invoking article 50 until such a deal has passed a Commons vote.
I'm not sure that works, though. The ECJ ruling on the revocability of Article 50 considers this:
40 The Council and the Commission argue that the Member State concerned could thus use its right of revocation shortly before the end of the period laid down in Article 50(3) TEU and notify a new intention to withdraw immediately after that period expired, thereby triggering a new two-year negotiation period. By doing so, the Member State would enjoy, de facto, a right to negotiate its withdrawal without any time limit, rendering the period laid down in Article 50(3) TEU ineffective.

41 In addition, according to those institutions, a Member State could at any time use its right of revocation as leverage in negotiations. If the terms of the withdrawal agreement did not suit that Member State, it could threaten to revoke its notification and thus put pressure on the EU institutions in order to alter the terms of the agreement to its own advantage.
and concludes that, while the UK may revoke the A50 notification unilaterally, that revocation must be in good faith, and not simply a tactic to gain more time:
the revocation of the notification of the intention to withdraw must, first, be submitted in writing to the European Council and, secondly, be unequivocal and unconditional, that is to say that the purpose of that revocation is to confirm the EU membership of the Member State concerned under terms that are unchanged as regards its status as a Member State, and that revocation brings the withdrawal procedure to an end
CURIA - Documents

Rather, if the UK sought time to renegotiate the Withdrawal Agreement, then it would need to seek the unanimous agreement of all the EU 27 governments. That might be forthcoming following a change of government, after a general election, but I'm not at all sure the EU would be willing to prolong negotiations with the current administration, unless Theresa May (or her successor) agreed to abandon all the "red lines" and start over. Even then, I'm not at all sure the EU27 would think there was much point.

Also, I'm not at all sure that Parliament can actually direct the government to withdraw A50. Nor would it be able to repeal or amend the European Union (Withdrawal) Act without the government cooperating and making available parliamentary time.
 
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