SCOTUS set to overturn Roe and Casey

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Katheryne Helendale

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Her husband and kids are in Texas, so unless they also leave, she probably does plan on returning.
They would be wise to leave. Under Texas law, Kate's husband could (and likely will) be charged with aiding and abetting, and their children taken away and put in foster care.

I sure as hell wouldn't want to come back to that!
 

Kamilah Hauptmann

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They would be wise to leave. Under Texas law, Kate's husband could (and likely will) be charged with aiding and abetting, and their children taken away and put in foster care.

I sure as hell wouldn't want to come back to that!
So kind of like that North Korea thing where someone defects and the state takes revenge on the extended family?
 

Jolene Benoir

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A Black woman was criminally charged after a miscarriage. It shows the perils of pregnancy post-Roe


The doctor said that, while a fetal heartbeat was still present, Watts’ water had broken prematurely and the fetus she was carrying would not survive. He advised heading to the hospital to have her labor induced, so she could have what amounted to an abortion to deliver the nonviable fetus. Otherwise, she would face “significant risk” of death, according to records of her case.

That was a Tuesday in September. What followed was a harrowing three days entailing: multiple trips to the hospital; Watts miscarrying into, and then flushing and plunging, a toilet at her home; a police investigation of those actions; and Watts, who is Black, being charged with abuse of a corpse. That’s a fifth-degree felony punishable by up to a year in prison and a $2,500 fine.
 

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Kamilah Hauptmann

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All of a sudden, the unborn are not actual human beings with rights. The hypocrisy is fucking disgusting!
But think of the shareholders and Calvinist work ethic!
 

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Florida abortion rights advocates, who have seen access to the procedure erode in the state and nationally in recent years, reached a major milestone that could shape abortion access throughout the south.

Groups seeking a constitutional amendment protecting abortion on Friday secured enough state-certified signatures by the Feb. 1 deadline to put a referendum on the 2024 ballot.

If successful, voters in the country’s third-most populous state could undo Florida’s abortion bans, keeping access open to thousands of patients throughout the South who travel to Florida from neighboring states — and from as far away as Texas — to avoid more restrictive prohibitions.
 

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Katheryne Helendale

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Fucking God.

Because of Florida abortion laws, she carried her baby to term knowing he would die
A Florida woman, unable to get an abortion in her state, carried to term a baby who had no kidneys.

Deborah Dorbert’s son Milo died in her arms on March 3, shortly after he was born, just as her doctors had predicted he would.
She said her pregnancy was proceeding normally until November, when, at 24 weeks, an ultrasound showed that the fetus did not have kidneys and that she had hardly any amniotic fluid. Not only was the baby sure to die, her doctors told her, but the pregnancy put her at especially high risk of preeclampsia, a potentially deadly complication.

Her doctors told her it was too late to terminate the pregnancy in Florida, which bans nearly all abortions after 15 weeks. The only options were to go out of state to get an abortion or to carry the baby to full term, and Dorbert and her husband didn’t have the money to travel.
What followed was an agonizing 13 weeks of carrying a baby she knew would die and worrying about her own health. It left Dorbert with severe anxiety and depression for the first time in her life.

Florida law allows abortions after 15 weeks if two doctors confirm the diagnosis of a fatal fetal abnormality in writing, but doctors in Florida and states with similar laws have been hesitant to terminate such pregnancies for fear someone will question whether the abnormality was truly fatal. The penalties for violating the law are severe: Doctors can go to prison and face heavy fines and legal fees.