Protests in Belarus against stolen elections

Fionalein

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Sid

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Sounds pretty much like Putin's signature. If it is it's a dangerous game he's playing. Because tossing fuel into the revolutionary fires will risk the spark of civil unrest carrying over to the Motherland.

Maybe Trump is contagious?
Yes, this could easily backfire to Russia.
Putin is visiting Belarus this week for talks. I think he wants to replace the current dictator for a milder pro Russian puppet, in an effort to calm down the people and maintain control as much as possible.
 

Innula Zenovka

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It seems they tried to deport her, and some colleagues, to Ukraine, but she ripped up her passport at the border, refusing to leave, and is now in custody somewhere in Belarus.
 

Innula Zenovka

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Innula Zenovka

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Sovereignty

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Who could believe that singing will become such a critical form of protest?
My first reaction: Oh my. Where has this person been?

Naturally, Wikipedia article.

Impressive survey of countries around the world including ... Belarus.
The first famous Belorussian protest songs were created at the beginning of the 20th century during the rise of Belorussian People's Republic and war for independence from Russian Empire and Soviet Russia. This period includes such protest songs as "Advieku My Spali" ("We've slept enough", also known as Belorussian Marselliese) and "Vajaćki Marš" ("March of the Warriors"), which was an anthem of Belorussian People's Republic. The next period of protest songs was in the 1990s, with many created by such bands as NRM, Novaje Nieba and others, which led to unspoken prohibition of these musicians. As an example, Lavon Volski, frontman of NRM, Mroja and Krambambulia, had issues with officials at the majority of his concert due to the criticism of the Belorussian political system. One of the most famous bands of Belarus, Lyapis Trubetskoy, was forbidden from performing in the country due to being critical of Aleksandr Lukashenka in his lyrics. These prohibitions lead most "forbidden" bands to organize concerts in Vilnius, which, though situated in modern Lithuania, is considered to be a Belorussian historical capital because less than a hundred years ago most dwellers of Vilnius (Vilnia, as it was called before it was given to Lithuania) were Belorussians. But in the middle of the 2010s, the situation began to change a bit and many protest bands started to organize concerts in Belarus.
ETA: Besides all the protest songs from all over the world, there is the Singing Revolution of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia.
 
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