Nobody Cares: PRS

Sid

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See, that is how publicity works, whether it is a Trump or a Clinton.
Names sell the tickets.
 

Innula Zenovka

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See, that is how publicity works, whether it is a Trump or a Clinton.
Names sell the tickets.
Do you think something like CES 2020 -- a very major trade show -- has to work particularly hard to attract delegates?

I'd have thought most people who attend would have done so anyway regardless of who the keynote speaker is.

To my mind, she's more likely been invited because the organisers want something from the US government and they think she might be persuaded to put in a good word for them with her father than because they think people will be particularly interested in hearing what her speechwriters have given her to say.
 

Soen Eber

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It presumably varied from army to army and time to time, but weren't most infantry tactics based on moving as a group, with your shields locked together, stabbing with your short-swords between them? And, of course, as soon as they discovered the pike in medieval warfare, that was the infantry weapon of choice for centuries.

The typical medieval battle we see on TV and in the movies, with the lines of infantry breaking down into lots of individual melees, hacking at each other with swords, always seems a very odd way of doing it.
I could see a case for it, the ancient Greeks did it, having their heroes fight while the phalenx would push at each othen until one side got tired and went home. The American Indians were shocked by the totality of the early settlers in how willing they were to push things to the extremes. And Beduen raiders were happy just to get a couple sheep to score off an opposing tribe/family. This is more in the line of raiding or positional jockying for local power, "little battles".

Doesn't really work, fighting, if the lives being thrown away are the people you rely on for your income and source of food and there's a "big bad" like the local bully or the Huns or Persians hanging around in the background. Just showing you're not a push over and taking some iniative goes a long way in keeping your edge and making yourself secure. A kingdom, whatever that gets worn down ends up as a whole other level of being a target.
 
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Innula Zenovka

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I could see a case for it, the ancient Greeks did it, having their heroes fight while the phalenx would push at each othen until one side got tired and went home. The American Indians were shocked by the totality of the early settlers in how willing they were to push things to the extremes. And Beduen raiders were happy just to get a couple sheep to score off an opposing tribe/family. This is more in the line of raiding or positional jockying for local power, "little battles".

Doesn't really work, fighting, if the lives being thrown away are the people you rely on for your income and source of food and there's a "big bad" like the local bully or the Huns or Persians hanging around in the background. Just showing you're not a push over and taking some iniative goes a long way in keeping your edge and making yourself secure. A kingdom, whatever that gets worn down ends up as a whole other level of being a target.
The point, though, about phalanxes is precisely that they pushed at each other, and I think the Homeric accounts of heroes fighting it out with their swords while the hoplites pushed and shoved are probably not particularly historical -- if the kingdom or city state can afford to equip hoplites, then well-equipped heroes engaging in single combat are pretty much redundant.

Once the other side's line broke, that was pretty much it, I think.
 
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Soen Eber

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The point, though, about phalanxes is precisely that they pushed at each other, and I think the Homeric accounts of heroes fighting it out with their swords while the hoplites pushed and shoved are probably not particularly historical -- if the kingdom or city state can afford to equip hoplites, then well-equipped heroes engaging in single combat are pretty much redundant.

Once the other side's line broke, that was pretty much it, I think.
Actually I'm basing this off the "A History of Ancient Greece" podcast by Ryan Still. It's been maybe a year so I'm probably a bit off, and yes war is a serious business, but they still had their intermural leagues/annual "big fight" night between neighboring cities just to figure out who was going to get to farm this or that patch of land for the next year, complete with metaphorical jugs of beer and families watching from lawn chairs - well, in that spirit, rather.

Ya gotta remember that side by side with all the serious stuff that was a part of ancient life, there were a LOT of 25 year olds running around strutting their stuff - especially the Greeks - and blowing off steam, since most of the population was dead by their late 30's. Our early ancestors were "just kids" for the majority of their lives. Once you get to serious city states the rules changed of course, too many grown-ups, but until you get there, it was all clans, tribes, and families with shared histories and culture, with all that implies and ancient Greece was even more so. Not always so pretty maybe, but ... human.

Depends a lot on the "when". In the negative 800's and for maybe 200 years, the Greeks were barely holding on after a major depopulation and were pretty much broke, busted, disgusted and Mad Maxing. That pretty much there was the "Age of Heroes".
 
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Fionalein

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Clara D.

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What's it with the US and "war rooms"? Why does everyone in this country appear to be a gun-toting madman even when doing commercials?
Last I checked: Alberta, no matter how hard they try, still isn't Texas :p
 

Anya Ristow

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To my mind, she's more likely been invited because the organisers want something from the US government and they think she might be persuaded to put in a good word for them with her father than because they think people will be particularly interested in hearing what her speechwriters have given her to say.
If I want to transfer money to you for something I can't legally or ethically ask and you can't legally or ethically offer, we make the deal on something you more legitimately have to offer. For ex heads of state, that's speeches and books.

It might be possible for people to determine that the transaction wasn't worth the money for what was ostensibly acquired (the speech or book), but it's near impossible to prove it wasn't intended to be worth the money.
 

Bartholomew Gallacher

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Ya gotta remember that side by side with all the serious stuff that was a part of ancient life, there were a LOT of 25 year olds running around strutting their stuff - especially the Greeks - and blowing off steam, since most of the population was dead by their late 30's. Our early ancestors were "just kids" for the majority of their lives. Once you get to serious city states the rules changed of course, too many grown-ups, but until you get there, it was all clans, tribes, and families with shared histories and culture, with all that implies and ancient Greece was even more so. Not always so pretty maybe, but ... human.
Where does this weird idea come from? I am afraid, but you are utterly mistaken. The ancient Greeks and Romans at least had about the same average life span we had 150 years ago, or so.

You are confusing the statistical measure life expectancy with the real life span. This man here is responsible for that type of confusion many people do have about it: Ignaz Semmelweis, one of the unknown heroes of science and mankind and unsung life saver of literally billions of people.



Before Semmelweis happened, postpartum infections where a common thing because the hygiene of birth giving was not there. Babies where infected always with bacteria and viruses, and it was common that 30% of the newborns died within a few days/weeks after being born.

Semmelweis introduced as simple method that the midwifes and physicians washed their hands before starting to work every time and also cleaned their tools, which reduced the mortality rate almost to 0%. This has been since then a global standard procedure.

So coming back to ancient Greek this means that if a mother gave birth to let's say three children, you can expect at least one of it to die soon after birth. The other two however were living their normal lifes.

So simple calculation: (0 years + 60 years + 70 years) / 3 = 43 years of life expectancy, roughly. Here's a controlled study below, which found out that the median age 100 BC of their Roman sample was 72 years.

So in reality ancient Romans and Greeks used to get as old as modern people get today, the only difference is just that many of their brothers and sisters died shortly after birth. Which is an uncommon thing now in industrial countries, but you can still witness e.g. in many countries of Africa.

The same applies by the way to all epochs that came after the ancient world, like medieval times.

You are right though about that most people in ancient times tried to get children soon at young age, but for a different reason: not because people died so soon, but because children were the social network of that time. And since it was common knowledge that not every birth will make it back then, they knew that needed to have several attempts for some children to come through.

 
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Innula Zenovka

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Very interesting (I found it so, anyway) thread in which British barristers discuss Harvey Weinstein's lawyer's approach to the trial, and how strange it seems to British legal eyes:

 
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Fionalein

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Last I checked: Alberta, no matter how hard they try, still isn't Texas :p
My perception of Texas is that they prefer to point 19th century antiquities into your direction instead of modern firearms... are there any more differences of note?