Nobody Cares: PRS

Innula Zenovka

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The range of problems faced by people who can afford $50 for fortune telling turned out to be limited: troubles with romance, troubles at work, trouble mustering the courage for a much-needed change. I heard these stories so often I could often guess what the problem was the moment someone walked in. Heartbroken young men, for example, talk about it to psychics, because it’s less risky than telling their friends. Sometimes I’d mischievously say, “Let her go. She’s not worth it,” as soon as one arrived. Once I heard, “Oh my God, oh my GOD!” as an amazed guy fell backwards down the stairs.

I also learned that intelligence and education do not protect against superstition. Many customers were stockbrokers, advertising executives or politicians, dealing with issues whose outcomes couldn’t be controlled. It’s uncertainty that drives people into woo, not stupidity, so I’m not surprised millennials are into astrology. They grew up with Harry Potter and graduated into a precarious economy, making them the ideal customers.
 

Isabeau

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"Gates, who describes himself as in favor of progressive taxation, said that he’s not going to declare who he’ll vote for in 2020, but suggested that he’s at least open to voting for Trump if his opponent isn’t “professional” enough."
 

Kamilah Hauptmann

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"Gates, who describes himself as in favor of progressive taxation, said that he’s not going to declare who he’ll vote for in 2020, but suggested that he’s at least open to voting for Trump if his opponent isn’t “professional” enough."
"Democracy might cost me money and by extension, power," says one of the good guy billionaires.
 

Jolene Benoir

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"Gates, who describes himself as in favor of progressive taxation, said that he’s not going to declare who he’ll vote for in 2020, but suggested that he’s at least open to voting for Trump if his opponent isn’t “professional” enough."
Who could possibly be more rational, mature, well-spoken and honest than Trump, right? I mean, those are some big shoes to fill in terms of professionalism.
 

Isabeau

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If you are very rich/powerful, having Trump (or anyone similar, or GOP) as president doesn't affect you at all. Even if you think of yourself as progressive when it comes to social and even economic issues, if it affects your $/influence and power, never mind how much more it affects everyone else.

Money is a disease. Or too much of it, anyway.
 

Innula Zenovka

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Maybe Gates' idea is that he thinks a good deal of US government spending is unnecessary or even harmful (paying private prisons to incarcerate far too many people, subsidies to the fossil fuel industry, detention camps for the children of asylum seekers and so on) so he'd rather pay as little as possible to the government and, instead, spend via the Gates Foundation on things he considers worthwhile?
 
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Dakota Tebaldi

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Kamilah Hauptmann

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The rich are getting free money because capitalism is broken, says billionaire hedge fund founder

I don't want to quote this because for one it's not tremendously long and for another you really need to read all of it, because it's a concise explanation by an actual billionaire capitalist that is more useful than a simple "capitalism is bad, mmkay", and also can't be dismissed as a "lazy poor" just being bitter.
Huh, not even Warren Buffett.

Maybe Gates' idea is that he thinks a good deal of US government spending is unnecessary or even harmful (paying private prisons to incarcerate far too many people, subsidies to the fossil fuel industry, detention camps for the children of asylum seekers and so on) so he'd rather pay as little as possible to the government and, instead, spend on via the Gates Foundation on things he considers worthwhile?
Hot take: Awesome the way rich dudes set up trusts so even after death their will must be obeyed even as circumstances change.
 

Isabeau

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Maybe Gates' idea is that he thinks a good deal of US government spending is unnecessary or even harmful (paying private prisons to incarcerate far too many people, subsidies to the fossil fuel industry, detention camps for the children of asylum seekers and so on) so he'd rather pay as little as possible to the government and, instead, spend on via the Gates Foundation on things he considers worthwhile?
And this is why he would be open to voting for Trump if he thought the Dem opponent wasn't to his liking? I'm not certain how that would help. He even said that he didn't think someone like warren wouldn't want to meet and discuss with someone like him, to which she has responded, euh no, I would be happy to have a sit down with you...
 
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Innula Zenovka

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Lengthy article about voter suppression in the US, part of a year long campaign in the run-up to next year's elections:

 

danielravennest

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Did it ever work?
In recent history, it worked well enough when unions were strong and tax rates were high. Workers got a reasonable share of the fruits of their labor, and the executives and stockholders were not incentivized to rip off a huge share for themselves (it would just get taxed away). In the previous century, the only way to get big projects like steel plants and railroads built was collecting enough capital from the "fat cats". To the extent those projects were useful, capitalism was working. In the century before that, when the Industrial Revolution was getting under way, projects were smaller, and were financed by wealthy landowners or businessmen in "joint stock companies". Something like twenty people pooled their money to build a cloth mill, and shared in the profits. You didn't need bankers and other middle-men.