Nobody Cares about History

Lexxi

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Picts, maybe. Not the English.
Picts descendants, it is assumed, of Caledonii, who in turn were descendants of Britons (Celtic Britons or Ancient Britons), "who inhabited Great Britain from at least the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages". Current evidence shows "earliest Iron Age" to be 800–600 BC. Stonehenge roughly 3000 B.C. (or 5,000 years ago). And Waun Mawn being from roughly 3600 to 3200 B.C. So Stonehenge stones "moved" from Waun Mawn roughly, 2200 years before "earliest Iron Age" Britons. So not Picts.
 

Innula Zenovka

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Honourable discharge certificates issued to non-citizen Roman legionaries after 25 years service (26 in the navy), cast in bronze and granting, among other things, them and their descendants Roman citizenship and all the rights and privileges that went with it.

It's 1,950 years old, and still has 5 of the original 7 seals intact.

Fascinating thread on these ancient documents.
 

Free

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In 1856, 23-year-old Kate Warne walked into the Pinkerton Detective Agency—which had never hired a woman for anything other than clerical work—and walked out with a job as a detective. She had a successful career with the Pinkertons that included uncovering and foiling a plot to assassinate then-President-elect Abraham Lincoln, who she later worked for as a spy during the Civil War.

This story is crying out for a movie treatment.
 

Lexxi

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Soen Eber

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No, Levers.

Megalith Movers

I've moved sizable logs by myself with a large branch and something for a fulcrum.
Watching that, I came to realize it could have been a "winter project" once food had been laid up and there was no more work that could be done. I could see them creating trails of packed snow and ice across land and bogs and over frozen lakes.

Has there been any investigation into this? There must have been stones that fell through the ice and are still there to be discovered, long poles preserved in marshes, and evidence around/underneath some of those ancestral paths that are still in use by ramblers or as roads.
 

Innula Zenovka

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The contentious report, which I've read and found fascinating, is no more than a serious, well-documented, factual and non-judgemental account of the role of colonialism and historic slavery in the history the Trust's buildings and collections.

I've not seen so many members of parliament so upset over something they clearly haven't read since The Satanic Verses.

 

danielravennest

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Watching that, I came to realize it could have been a "winter project" once food had been laid up and there was no more work that could be done. I could see them creating trails of packed snow and ice across land and bogs and over frozen lakes.

Has there been any investigation into this? There must have been stones that fell through the ice and are still there to be discovered, long poles preserved in marshes, and evidence around/underneath some of those ancestral paths that are still in use by ramblers or as roads.
Sledding has been considered a way to move the megaliths. The downsides to the idea are that the people doing the moving also lose traction, and there is no stopping a rock going downhill if it gets out of control. Now that they have identified the previous location of the stones, they can more carefully examine proposed routes, to see if there is any evidence of how they got from A to B.

I may or may not have mentioned my pet theory of why Stonehenge and similar constructions look like they do.

Iron-age round-houses were circular rings of posts with cross-beams, with the inner rings being taller to support the sloped roof rafters. That's the same layout as Stonehenge. So it may have originally had a wood frame roof and just been a bigger version of the houses people lived in, and used for community or ceremonial purposes.

 
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Soen Eber

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Sledding has been considered a way to move the megaliths. The downsides to the idea are that the people doing the moving also lose traction, and there is no stopping a rock going downhill if it gets out of control. Now that they have identified the previous location of the stones, they can more carefully examine proposed routes, to see if there is any evidence of how they got from A to B.

I may or may not have mentioned my pet theory of why Stonehenge and similar constructions look like they do.

Iron-age round-houses were circular rings of posts with cross-beams, with the inner rings being taller to support the sloped roof rafters. That's the same layout as Stonehenge. So it may have originally had a wood frame roof and just been a bigger version of the houses people lived in, and used for community or ceremonial purposes.

Yes, it would have to be a route with a low gradient, like railways require. I suppose on winter slopes, there would have to be strong stakes on each side of the route so ropes could be used to hold it against gravity, or wedges/stakes pounded in behind it so it would be doable.

I don't know if there would be the problem with people not having traction as it would be easy enough to cover the walking area with boughs and bullrushes, either on the sides or in front. Since those materials need to be gathered anyways for daily use and construction the rest of the year, there would not be a huge material or time penalty - and I suspect winter activity would have to be semi-nomadic anyways since you wouldn't be able to hunt or pasture in the same spot over the 3 or4 months of winter, you'd need to keep moving. A hybrid hunter/gatherer & agriculture system was likely needed then as a transition to full agriculture.

I still think they would have to move the stones in winter for the previously stated reasons. You can get a pretty comfortable speed on packed snow and ice, and if you're going to be semi-nomadic you might as well haul a big piece or stone alone the way.

Your theory would explain the post holes that have been found around Stonehenge, and it ties in with sympathetic magic. Did the ancient Britons follow the "as above, so below" meme?
 

danielravennest

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Did the ancient Britons follow the "as above, so below" meme?
Common Brittonic, the language the Romans found when they arrived, had writing, but not a literature, as far as I know. Stonehenge is a couple of thousand years older than the Roman's arrival, so I don't know how much we know of their beliefs, if anything.
 
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