Nobody Cares about History

Bartholomew Gallacher

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Buzz not only was an astronaut, but a fighter pilot and had a doctorate in Astronautics from MIT. He later did work on "cycling orbits", which go back and forth between planets using their gravity to change course. At work we affectionately called that the "Buzzmobile".
For the record: at the time of me posting this Buzz Aldrin is still alive and kicking being 90 years old, so he still has this doctorate.

This Erfurt incidence: interesting, I should visit the city and look if the historical places are still there.
 

Bartholomew Gallacher

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Passport for a dead Pharaoh: in 1974 the corpse of mummified Pharaoh Ramesses II. was being transported by plane from Egypt to France for some "maintenance work."

Since French law required that anybody, dead or alive, must have a valid passport when entering France the Republic of Egypt issued a valid passport for the over 3000 year old mummy.

The actual passport was never disclosed with the public, so here's an artistic rendering of it.

 
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Workers at the Nazca Lines site recently found the faded, partially eroded outline of a cat stretching across a desert hillside.

The cat joins the ever-growing list of about 900 shapes and images that ancient people etched into the Nazca Desert soil. At 37 meters (121 feet) long, the cat is among the smaller geoglyphs in the desert; some of the largest shapes, down on the flat valley floor, span more than 500 meters (1,600 feet). Like other geoglyphs in the Nazca Desert, the cat’s ancient designers etched it into the ground by clearing away the dark surface sediment to form pale lines.
 

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I'm not sure that I buy this figure was contemporary with the rest of the lines. Stylistically it has nothing in common with them. I'm gonna say this is a lot more modern until there's some solid evidence otherwise.
People created the giant cat figure between 2,500 and 1,800 years ago, according to the chief archaeologists for the Nazca Lines site, Johny Isla. He told Spanish news agency Efe that the cat looks very similar to cat motifs on textiles from the Paracas culture, which flourished in the area between 500 BCE and 200 CE—centuries before the Nazca culture, which usually gets credit for most of the valley’s geoglyphs.
I found a short bio of Isla, which states he's director of Andean Institute of Archaeological Studies and codirector of the Nasca-Palpa Project. So I hope you don't mind if I choose to take his word over yours.
 

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I'm not sure that I buy this figure was contemporary with the rest of the lines. Stylistically it has nothing in common with them. I'm gonna say this is a lot more modern until there's some solid evidence otherwise.
Ars Technica said:
People created the giant cat figure between 2,500 and 1,800 years ago, according to the chief archaeologists for the Nazca Lines site, Johny Isla. He told Spanish news agency Efe that the cat looks very similar to cat motifs on textiles from the Paracas culture, which flourished in the area between 500 BCE and 200 CE—centuries before the Nazca culture, which usually gets credit for most of the valley’s geoglyphs.
So if not contemporary, older.