Global insect populations might be crashing

GoblinCampFollower

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I hate bugs. I always hated bugs. So it pains me to admit how scary this is. Now that I'm thinking of it, it makes complete sense. I swear bugs were EVERYWHERE when I was a kid, and now I go for days at a time without seeing one. I don't think it's only because I live in a city.

EDIT: one other thing the article talks about that I agree with is I think we all used to have to clean bugs of our windshields a lot more often than we do now. It's a very common observation.

The Insect Apocalypse Is Here
 
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Katheryne Helendale

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The bugs are very much alive and well around here. and as long as we continue to have mild winters, there's really nothing to control their population here.

I do worry about the bee population though, particularly as large numbers of them commit hari kari on my windshield when I drive out on the rural highways here.
 

Tigger

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Probably connected to the massive amounts of pesticides used by agriculture. A lot of people will just shrug at the news but we need them, even if we hate them. The bees were the ones that people noticed most but they aren't the only pollinators.

We've so fucked up our planet.
 

Khamon

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We have eighty-two-quadrillion bumblebees in our garden. Everyone else in the county does too. We have no shortage of the bumblebees if anyone would like a truckload or two.
 

Aribeth Zelin

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Bees aren't native to the US though....at least, not honeybees - in other words, before we brought them in, there were other pollinators.
 

Beebo Brink

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Insects are part of the broad base of the terrestrial food chain. Their reduced numbers have a rippling effect on all the life forms above them, from bats to birds and even fish. This is like knocking out a card in the bottom tier in a house of cards.
 

Noodles

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Plenty of bugs at my house. I can choose between having a zillion weird little white bugs or a few giant ass spiders on the back porch, since the spiders tend to catch the annoying bugs.

I guess spiders are not technically bugs.

We also have several carpenter bees, which are creepy.
 

Free

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I totally agree on the bees part. They are essential for the health's planet and our life as well.
How about spam?


EDIT: Yep. Definitely agrees about spam as an essential...
 
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Beebo Brink

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The bugs are very much alive and well around here. and as long as we continue to have mild winters, there's really nothing to control their population here.
Plenty of bugs at my house. I can choose between having a zillion weird little white bugs or a few giant ass spiders on the back porch, since the spiders tend to catch the annoying bugs.
Your perceptions are not a scientific finding. The substantial drop in insect populations is global, from industrialized nations to remote tropical jungles. Particular species of insects -- ones you tend to notice more than others -- may be doing fine in your area, but chances are that dozens, if not hundreds, of other insects you never notice are declining in numbers. "Mild winters" aren't the crucial factor since this same decline is observed in areas that remain warm all year round.

The collapse of insect populations has been noted for years now, and we still don't know if there is any single cause or whether it's death by a thousand cuts. Either way, it's just another sign of de-stabilization in our current ecological health.