Doomed, delusional, divided and corrupt: How the Democratic Party became a haunted house

Han Held

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Baby Goebbels is a Millennial.
Aren't most of the leaders of the alt right Millennials too? Richard Spencer et al?

That's one reason I'm really skeptical when people tell me things will magically improve once the boomers and Xers are gone.
 

Han Held

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That's one reason I'm really skeptical when people tell me things will magically improve once the boomers and Xers are gone.
I feel like ppl might think I've said two contradictory things in this thread, so lemme clarify:

Basically, I think that things CAN'T improve with the old guard blocking the way...but the old guard being out of the way doesn't guarantee that shit WILL improve once that happens.
 
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Aribeth Zelin

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Yeah, the spouse was born in 70 and he hates that Ryan and Cruz are both his age.
 
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danielravennest

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The revolution will not be televised, but local and small organizers, local media and so me, and state level defensive legal actions will be our actual resistance. The DNC cannot lead and must follow.
I work with the county Democratic Party, and communicate with neighbors on the NextDoor social site. That's where we discuss local problems and encourage each other to go vote.
 

Kara Spengler

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Then there's Senator Breadbags...yep.
Politically speaking, I'm deeply ashamed of my Xer peers.
Some Xers boggle my mind but others are great. You have that with any generation, even in the same demographics.
 
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GoblinCampFollower

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Aren't most of the leaders of the alt right Millennials too? Richard Spencer et al?
Hillary won the Millennial vote in almost every state. Alt righters really aren't a very big voting block. Trump's core base of support is senile. Reagan was more popular with boomers than Trump is with Millennials.

I am somewhat confident that once the boomers are gone, there will be a big shift left politically; BUUUUUT the remaining alt righters will be more extreme, and more likely to commit acts of terror. So it won't all be sunshine and roses.
 

Brenda Archer

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I'm thankful for your optimism Brenda. I'd like to point out a couple of things though. When the phrase The revolution will not be televised was coined there was no internet. The only way people could spread the word was through the phone or mail, maybe underground newspapers. Also, for perspective, around 100,000 people attend the Portland Blues festival each weekend a year. It's quite a few people but nothing to make headlines across the country. There are 8 football stadiums in the US that hold over 100,000 people. There isn't a darn thing happening that I know of here around Philly for example, not even a gathering of 100 people.
Photo Gallery | Highlights from the 2019 Philadelphia Climate Strike
 
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Brenda Archer

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The first American president who died during his term was William Henry Harrison in 1841. This event lead to a dispute, because the American constitution had no regulation for such an event.

In 1967 the constitution was finally amended with a regulation that covers such a case. It took only 126 years to do so.

This is one of the problems with the American constitution - slow changes, if ever.
It’s always been a compromise document. The original colonies were very different from one another, and the early states. The Federal government did not have a level of power we would now take for normal until after the Civil War.

This has always been a mixed bag, but because 20th century civil rights laws and court decisions have been Federal, most people not on the hard Right have supported a strong Federal government. Middle class job mobility is based on the assumption that all states are roughly similar (which they are, for the more privileged).

But I don’t want a Constitutional Convention. The Dominionists would use it to completely replace our norms in favor of theocracy.

We don’t have to do it anyway. Giving either PR or DC statehood would go a long way toward restoring majority rule.
 
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Brenda Archer

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Someone born in 1964 would also not be a boomer -they'd either be an X'er or a member of Generation Jones; depending on which of several definitions you believe. So even less monolithic.

I agree that simply swapping out the dems and republicans for two different parties won't help, that's a given. What I mean is that we need more choices, and power needs to be held by more than two parties. We have a duopoly, and I believe that's a major factor keeping any meaningful change from occurring.
I’m in this “Generation Jones” so I’m glad to hear it’s been recognized, though I don’t agree with the choice of label.

It seems to me that state level alternative parties could form that caucus with the Dems in Congress, but do their own thing locally. The closest existing example I know well is the combination of Bernie’s machine and town meetings (direct democracy) in Vermont.

There must be other examples of local autonomy (I often get this vibe from Philadelphia, but don’t know it well). If a large state evolved a party, it could eventually become a player in the House. I don’t see another way, through.
 

Brenda Archer

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What am I supposed to do about the GOP if the Dems are basically going to sit on their hands?

That's why I shared this -we need to understand that the Dems are not doing what they need to, why, and from there pressure them to do the right thing or replace them with folks who will.

Or accept that fact what we do won't matter at all, and say "fuck it".
The Dems in the House who won’t support impeachment have not really given us any concretes about why. I’ve lost patience and hope they get primaried. If they want support, they need to explain themselves better.
 

Brenda Archer

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This is probably a different conversation -but I think it's more interesting to look at the recent acknowlegement of "generation jones"..the cohort right before our generation (people born in the early 60's, basically).

Though for the sake of perspective I have to point out that a lot of the talk of "generations" is mostly branding -I think demographic attitudes are probably universal (IE old white GOP X'ers aren't signifigantly different from old white GOP boomers etc)
I don’t see a large difference between this defined “Generation Jones” and Gen X. I think the effect of the PC is overstated, and the changes in the economy in the latter part of the 70’s are more important.

The adoption of the PC wasn’t universal - it was initially limited to people who used one at school or work. There are plenty of Gen X people who are not digital natives. The population as a whole didn’t really get “online” until AOL and similar mass services.

But then there are Generation Jones people who adopted everything they could in the Eighties.

This all matters less than it used to. The blind spot, in the older right leaning Boomers, is that they don’t understand the losses in the rights of employees and in wealth accumulation that have impeded later generations, and so they don’t correctly see capitalism as predatory.
 
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Han Held

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This all matters less than it used to. The blind spot, in the older right leaning Boomers, is that they don’t understand the losses in the rights of employees and in wealth accumulation that have impeded later generations, and so they don’t correctly see capitalism as predatory.
I agree completely -110%.

Their experience leaving high school was having readily available college (my understanding is that someone born in 47 who graduated in 65 even got college free in California before Reagan changed that) or higher-paying (relative to the economy) blue-collar jobs. This did change some with the gas crisis in the 70's but even there opportunities were still fairly easy to come by.

Xer's didn't have this exact experience, but I think a lot of us had our world view shaped by the Boomer's experience ...hence why so many of us skewed conservative despite it going against what we experienced.

As a result you have older white conservatives who both want to pull the ladder up behind them (Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell specifically) or who simply don't "get it" when Mellenials and younger describe how fucked it is for them to make a living wage and pay off exorbitant student debt.