Coronavirus Updates

Sovereignty

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If only I read German, but translate.com looks reasonable.

According to Bauer, more than half of the world's vaccine doses are expected to be transported by air freight – simply because of speed and reliability.The Corona pandemic has caused disruption sours in global pharmaceutical supply chains, as air freight capacity has not been sufficient due to suspensions and suspensions of passenger flights.Bauer: "Luckily, some organizations are working to ensure that the best possible logistical arrangements are taken before vaccine certification and subsequent shipment.The challenge is enormous." Production of the vaccine is expected to peak in the second quarter of 2021.Airports need to start assessing how they could be involved in this unprecedented distribution operation.According to Bauer, the cost of the largest airlift cannot be estimated at this time.
 
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Casey Pelous

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If only I read German, but translate.com looks reasonable.

I don't know if it is the translation or not, but something's goofy there.

First, where are they going to find these 8,000 jumbo jets? I realize Boeing isn't the only airplane maker, but they've only made about 1,500 747's in all the time they've been making them, with some 788 still in service. Lump in every operational airplane that could reasonably be called a "jumbo jet" and I still don't think you'll reach 8,000.

Besides, it doesn't take 8,000 planes to make 15,000 flights! The Berlin Airlift involved about 300 planes, 277,000 flights and moved over 2,000,000 tons of supplies.

.

Well, I'd Googled that much, I had to know ... how much stuff can a jumbo jet carry?

Turns out a 747 can haul about five semi-trucks full of cargo. If we give up half of the space for "special cooling equipment", that's still 2.5 semi-trucks needed per load, and those need to have the special cooling equipment, too.

I think some aviation industry consultant needs to grease his slide rule!
 

Plurabelle Laszlo

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I don't know if it is the translation or not, but something's goofy there.

First, where are they going to find these 8,000 jumbo jets? I realize Boeing isn't the only airplane maker, but they've only made about 1,500 747's in all the time they've been making them, with some 788 still in service. Lump in every operational airplane that could reasonably be called a "jumbo jet" and I still don't think you'll reach 8,000.

Besides, it doesn't take 8,000 planes to make 15,000 flights! The Berlin Airlift involved about 300 planes, 277,000 flights and moved over 2,000,000 tons of supplies.
Lost in translation - the article says they would need the shipping volume of 8.000 Boeing 747 to ship one dosis of vaccine to every human being on earth - not that they would need 8.000 airplanes to do so.
 

danielravennest

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Lost in translation - the article says they would need the shipping volume of 8.000 Boeing 747 to ship one dosis of vaccine to every human being on earth - not that they would need 8.000 airplanes to do so.
There are around 25,000 commercial jets in service. Most are smaller than a 747, and most are passenger rather than cargo, but I figure a few flights per plane will cover the transportation needs for the vaccine. Even passenger planes have cargo holds. And given the pandemic, there are a lot of surplus planes not flying right now.
 

Kamilah Hauptmann

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There are around 25,000 commercial jets in service. Most are smaller than a 747, and most are passenger rather than cargo, but I figure a few flights per plane will cover the transportation needs for the vaccine. Even passenger planes have cargo holds. And given the pandemic, there are a lot of surplus planes not flying right now.
Let's call it... The Aviation Iditarod! :D
 

Sovereignty

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Lost in translation - the article says they would need the shipping volume of 8.000 Boeing 747 to ship one dosis of vaccine to every human being on earth - not that they would need 8.000 airplanes to do so.
I like the Santa Claus version: everything gets delivered in one night.
 

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Drugmaker AstraZeneca said Monday that late-stage trials showed its COVID-19 vaccine is highly effective [~90%], buoying the prospects of a relatively cheap, easy-to-store product that may become the vaccine of choice for the developing world.

The results are based on an interim analysis of trials in the U.K. and Brazil of a vaccine developed by Oxford University and manufactured by AstraZeneca. No hospitalizations or severe cases of COVID-19 were reported in those receiving the vaccine.

AstraZeneca is the third major drug company to report late-stage data for a potential COVID-19 vaccine as the world waits for scientific breakthroughs that will end a pandemic that has pummeled the world economy and led to 1.4 million deaths. But unlike the others, the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine doesn’t have to be stored at freezer temperatures, making it potentially easier to distribute, especially in developing countries.
 

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A highly anticipated COVID-19 vaccine has delivered some encouraging — but head-scratching — results. The vaccine developed by the University of Oxford, UK, and pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca was found to be, on average, 70% effective in a preliminary analysis of phase III trial data, the developers announced in a press release on 23 November.

But the analysis found a striking difference in efficacy, depending on the amount of vaccine delivered to a participant. A regimen consisting of two full doses given a month apart looked to be just 62% effective. But, surprisingly, participants who received a lower amount of the vaccine in a first dose and then the full amount in the second dose were 90% less likely to develop COVID, compared with participants in the placebo arm.
 
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Innula Zenovka

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This looks encouraging. The fact Johnson's enthusiastic about it means nothing, of course, but the fact that Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, also feels confident in expressing what is, for him, an uncharacteristically optimistic view about the future does mean quite a lot, I think


Evernote link because paywall