Brexit.

Casey Pelous

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By the way it turns out that in general it would be possible to build such a bridge; but you would build it as a floating bridge, not a bridge with normal pillars.

That's the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge, Seattle USA, 2350 m length, which was built in 2016. Then again a floating bridge such long would have its own problems I guess.
That one replaced a floating bridge in the same spot that had been there since the 1960's. We have some experience with floating bridges here. The old one could get shut down by a three-foot chop. Now, I think it takes four-foot chop.

I've never been there, but I rather imagine that chunk of open ocean is a bit more challenging than Lake Washington.
 

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That one replaced a floating bridge in the same spot that had been there since the 1960's. We have some experience with floating bridges here. The old one could get shut down by a three-foot chop. Now, I think it takes four-foot chop.

I've never been there, but I rather imagine that chunk of open ocean is a bit more challenging than Lake Washington.
Take that three and four foot chop and make it three and four meters.
 
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danielravennest

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By the way it turns out that in general it would be possible to build such a bridge; but you would build it as a floating bridge, not a bridge with normal pillars.

That's the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge, Seattle USA, 2350 m length, which was built in 2016. Then again a floating bridge such long would have its own problems I guess.

The previous bridge sank.
 
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Casey Pelous

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There are two floating bridges across Lake Washington; the I-90/Lacey V. Murrow floating bridge and the State Route 520, Evergreen Point floating bridge, which is north of the former. The 520, which I don't think ever sank but just became too darn puny for a big city, takes you to the north side of downtown Seattle on the west end, and right by Bill Gates' house on the east end. If you continue eastbound on 520, you're very quickly at Microsoft HQ -- so Bill's commute isn't too crushing. The I-90 takes you to the south side of downtown Seattle on the west end, or to Renton -- where they build the 737MAXes -- on the east end.

This concludes your guided tour of the floating bridges of Seattle, please exit the bus carefully!
 

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Bozo won't or doesn't want to learn that there's a difference between dreaming big and dreaming stupid.
 

Ariane

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I'm inclined to think that barring some global catastrophe, UK will never rejoin the EU in most of our lifetimes.

What will almost certainly happen at some point is that UK (or what's left of it at the time) will rejoin the customs unions and free trade block, aka the Norway/Switzerland model, and therefore import export and immigration rules will be dictated by Brussels.

I see a recession/depression within the UK until they do, so hopefully it is sooner rather than later.
 

Innula Zenovka

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I'm inclined to think that barring some global catastrophe, UK will never rejoin the EU in most of our lifetimes.

What will almost certainly happen at some point is that UK (or what's left of it at the time) will rejoin the customs unions and free trade block, aka the Norway/Switzerland model, and therefore import export and immigration rules will be dictated by Brussels.

I see a recession/depression within the UK until they do, so hopefully it is sooner rather than later.
While I agree the UK's future is with the EU, whether as full members or with a close association agreement, I've given up on making predictions about when things are going to happen.

I mean, if in February 2015 someone had told me they thought that, in five years' time, the UK would have left the EU and Donald Trump would be President of the USA, I'd had have thought they were insane, and yet here we are.

So I'm out of the predictions business, and particularly because so much depends, for the UK, at least, on what happens this year in the next phase of the Brexit negotiations. While I know what I think will eventually happen, because economic logic and geography will eventually dictate it does, I just don't think we have enough data to predict what route will lead us there.

Nor, of course, do I know what spanners Fate may be intending to throw into the works, and what their effects might be -- however the epidemic/pandemic of Covid-19 (as Coronavirus has been officially named) develops, how it spreads, what the ultimate fatality rate is, and so forth, it's bound to have economic and social effects, many of them potentially quite profound, worldwide. And that's only the first spanner of what could, in their nature, a whole shower of the things.
 
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Kara Spengler

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I think they mentioned something about really bad weather on the Irish Sea.

Yeh, problems.

You could avoid some by building the floating bridge in pieces, and you could shuttle them back and forth like ferries.
Yeah, you would need to do it in segments. For example, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge over here spans a good chunk of the atlantic but it is more like several bridges and tunnels.
 
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Kara Spengler

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That one replaced a floating bridge in the same spot that had been there since the 1960's. We have some experience with floating bridges here. The old one could get shut down by a three-foot chop. Now, I think it takes four-foot chop.

I've never been there, but I rather imagine that chunk of open ocean is a bit more challenging than Lake Washington.
Not unprecedented though. I can think of a couple examples offhand where a good chunk of the atlantic was bridged. In addition to the Chesapeake Bay at least one of the dykes in the Netherlands.
 
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There was a boy who stuck his finger in a dike and saved the country.
 

Sid

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They can always ask the Dutch to make a polder out of the Irish Sea...... :D
 

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There was a boy who stuck his finger in a dike and saved the country.
Yup, coming straight out of an American novel. Hans Brinker; or, the Silver Skates: A Story of Life in Holland by Mary Mapes Dodge
A totally made up story, but good for the tourist industry, so some places even have a statue for 'our hero' Hansje Brinker. :)
(Don't tell anybody please, bad for business).

The dykes ain't made of brick and cement, but they are structures mainly made out of boulders, topped with clay and sand layers, with only a top layer of smaller stones at the sea or river side to break the waves. On the inland side the top layer is often grass.
If water comes out of a dyke. it means that the clay layers inside are totally saturated and water will sip through at dozens of places at the same time and if the water pressure doesn't lower within a few days, the dyke will start to slide and the land will be flooded.
 

Bartholomew Gallacher

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Yeah, you would need to do it in segments. For example, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge over here spans a good chunk of the atlantic but it is more like several bridges and tunnels.
Well you can count on the Dutch to build such structures. The bridge between NIE and Scotland would be 19 km long; in the 80s the Dutch built the King Fahd Causeway between Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, which is 25 kilometres long. But then this is a bay area with no deep grounds.

 
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Argent Stonecutter

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Yeah, you would need to do it in segments. For example, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge over here spans a good chunk of the atlantic but it is more like several bridges and tunnels.
The Chesapeake Bay bridge-tunnel is also in pretty shallow water.

But I was also actually suggesting ferries. At least we know how to do that.

I suppose they could do something like Harry Harrison's submerged floating tunnel but that's literally science fiction.
 
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Bartholomew Gallacher

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I suppose they could do something like Harry Harrison's submerged floating tunnel but that's literally science fiction.
That's so humble compared to this idea from 2004: a tunnel from London to NYC for Maglevs in near vacuum, est. costs back then 88 to 175 billion US$.

 

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That is precisely what Harrison's 1972 story ("A Transatlantic Tunnel, Hurrah") was about, right down to the neutrally bouyant tunnel segments and the maglev operating in an evacuated tunnel.