Brexit.

Govi

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Not that it matters, now Jo Swinson is no longer an MP, let alone leader of the Lib Dems, but:



"For all sad words of tongue and pen, The saddest are these, 'It might have been'."
 
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Kamilah Hauptmann

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So apparently, voting Tory after voting Remain four years earlier Doesn't count as a vote to Leave. According to a Tory I know.

Same Tory is flabbergasted and still doesn't understand how anyone could vote Trump.

:confusedcat:
 
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Innula Zenovka

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So apparently, voting Tory after voting Remain four years earlier Doesn't count as a vote to Leave. According to a Tory I know.

Same Tory is flabbergasted and still doesn't understand how anyone could vote Trump.

:confusedcat:
To be fair, I think it might be true to say that, in many cases, people voted Tory primarily because they wanted an end to the deadlock and paralysis of the last three years (which has been absolute purgatory) and for government to address some of the ohe other important issues (NHS, the climate crisis, affordable housing, investment in former industrial areas, etc) , even though this means leaving the EU.

I don't necessarily agree with that view, but it I do understand it, if that is, indeed, your acquaintance's reasoning.
 

Kamilah Hauptmann

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To be fair, I think it might be true to say that, in many cases, people voted Tory primarily because they wanted an end to the deadlock and paralysis of the last three years (which has been absolute purgatory) and for government to address some of the ohe other important issues (NHS, the climate crisis, affordable housing, investment in former industrial areas, etc) , even though this means leaving the EU.

I don't necessarily agree with that view, but it I do understand it, if that is, indeed, your acquaintance's reasoning.
Charitable, but I feel they're party over country, and they've spoken as though Thatcher was the last great Prime Minister. I'll keep your perspective in mind nonetheless.

They're also young, so, who knows what the future holds.

I can but stare in amazement and confusion.
 
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Bartholomew Gallacher

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The UK gave the EU a nice poison pill as departing gift: in April 19 they voted pro article 13 of the new copyright directive, they were one of its supporters.

Now the science minister told the public that they are not going to implement that directive after the country left the EU.

 
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Innula Zenovka

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Charitable, but I feel they're party over country, and they've spoken as though Thatcher was the last great Prime Minister. I'll keep your perspective in mind nonetheless.

They're also young, so, who knows what the future holds.

I can but stare in amazement and confusion.
We can't know why people voted as they did, of course, and different voters had their different reasons, but certainly the Conservatives' slogan "Get Brexit Done!" resonated, even though signing the Withdrawal Agreement is simply the first stage -- and probably the easiest one -- in what's going to be a long and arduous process.

Certainly, I think everyone had had more than enough of Parliament simply spinning its wheels as the Government and Opposition bicked, both with each other and among themselves, unable to do anything other than vote against things they didn't want rather than to agree on anything they did want, or were even prepared to accept.

Things couldn't go on as they were, and while I would obviously rather have resolved it with a second referendum, I can see why other people were unwilling to prolong the uncertainty and bickering any longer. I think they will come to regret that, but I understand it.

Might be interesting to ask these fans of Mrs T what they make of her responsibility for the Single European Act: Margaret Thatcher: the critical architect of European integration - UK in a changing Europe and watch them stare in amazement and confusion, too.
 

Argent Stonecutter

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Pullman is a righteous dude.

This is the cherry on the sundae of fail that is this coin.
 
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OrinB

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Oxford isn't a separate part of the UK, so UK comma presides!
 
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Argent Stonecutter

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Thought I'd just drop this in, though

"Is it that hard to write a complex sentence without confusion?"

It's not hard, indeed, it's no difficulty at all to write verbose, obtuse and archaic (or should I say archaic and obtuse?) run-on sentences that require a moment's time (time that we shall never get back but only a moment's thereof) to comprehend... and yet I think, and hope, that no one is actually excusing me for wasting their (precious) time in this way. The same is true of leaving out the Oxford (or serial) comma out of the mistaken belief that this increasingly obscure and archaic convention is worth a moment's potential confusion in some number (however small) of one's readers because one believes, for no reason I can see, that this tiny speck of punctuation spoils the beauty of one's sentence.
 
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Innula Zenovka

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"Is it that hard to write a complex sentence without confusion?"

It's not hard, indeed, it's no difficulty at all to write verbose, obtuse and archaic (or should I say archaic and obtuse?) run-on sentences that require a moment's time (time that we shall never get back but only a moment's thereof) to comprehend... and yet I think, and hope, that no one is actually excusing me for wasting their (precious) time in this way. The same is true of leaving out the Oxford (or serial) comma out of the mistaken belief that this increasingly obscure and archaic convention is worth a moment's potential confusion in some number (however small) of one's readers because one believes, for no reason I can see, that this tiny speck of punctuation spoils the beauty of one's sentence.
"Their honour precarious, their liberty provisional, lasting only until the discovery of their crime; their position unstable, like that of the poet who one day was feasted at every table, applauded in every theatre in London, and on the next was driven from every lodging, unable to find a pillow upon which to lay his head, turning the mill like Samson and saying like him: "The two sexes shall die, each in a place apart!"; excluded even, save on the days of general disaster when the majority rally round the victim as the Jews rallied round Dreyfus, from the sympathy--at times from the society--of their fellows, in whom they inspire only disgust at seeing themselves as they are, portrayed in a mirror which, ceasing to flatter them, accentuates every blemish that they have refused to observe in themselves, and makes them understand that what they have been calling their love (a thing to which, playing upon the word, they have by association annexed all that poetry, painting, music, chivalry, asceticism have contrived to add to love) springs not from an ideal of beauty which they have chosen but from an incurable malady; like the Jews again (save some who will associate only with others of their race and have always on their lips ritual words and consecrated pleasantries), shunning one another, seeking out those who are most directly their opposite, who do not desire their company, pardoning their rebuffs, moved to ecstasy by their condescension; but also brought into the company of their own kind by the ostracism that strikes them, the opprobrium under which they have fallen, having finally been invested, by a persecution similar to that of Israel, with the physical and moral characteristics of a race, sometimes beautiful, often hideous, finding (in spite of all the mockery with which he who, more closely blended with, better assimilated to the opposing race, is relatively, in appearance, the least inverted, heaps upon him who has remained more so) a relief in frequenting the society of their kind, and even some corroboration of their own life, so much so that, while steadfastly denying that they are a race (the name of which is the vilest of insults), those who succeed in concealing the fact that they belong to it they readily unmask, with a view less to injuring them, though they have no scruple about that, than to excusing themselves; and, going in search (as a doctor seeks cases of appendicitis) of cases of inversion in history, taking pleasure in recalling that Socrates was one of themselves, as the Israelites claim that Jesus was one of them, without reflecting that there were no abnormals when homosexuality was the norm, no anti-Christians before Christ, that the disgrace alone makes the crime because it has allowed to survive only those who remained obdurate to every warning, to every example, to every punishment, by virtue of an innate disposition so peculiar that it is more repugnant to other men (even though it may be accompanied by exalted moral qualities) than certain other vices which exclude those qualities, such as theft, cruelty, breach of faith, vices better understood and so more readily excused by the generality of men; forming a freemasonry far more extensive, more powerful and less suspected than that of the Lodges, for it rests upon an identity of tastes, needs, habits, dangers, apprenticeship, knowledge, traffic, glossary, and one in which the members themselves, who intend not to know one another, recognise one another immediately by natural or conventional, involuntary or deliberate signs which indicate one of his congeners to the beggar in the street, in the great nobleman whose carriage door he is shutting, to the father in the suitor for his daughter's hand, to him who has sought healing, absolution, defence, in the doctor, the priest, the barrister to whom he has had recourse; all of them obliged to protect their own secret but having their part in a secret shared with the others, which the rest of humanity does not suspect and which means that to them the most wildly improbable tales of adventure seem true, for in this romantic, anachronistic life the ambassador is a bosom friend of the felon, the prince, with a certain independence of action with which his aristocratic breeding has furnished him, and which the trembling little cit would lack, on leaving the duchess's party goes off to confer in private with the hooligan; a reprobate part of the human whole, but an important part, suspected where it does not exist, flaunting itself, insolent and unpunished, where its existence is never guessed; numbering its adherents everywhere, among the people, in the army, in the church, in the prison, on the throne; living, in short, at least to a great extent, in a playful and perilous intimacy with the men of the other race, provoking them, playing with them by speaking of its vice as of something alien to it; a game that is rendered easy by the blindness or duplicity of the others, a game that may be kept up for years until the day of the scandal, on which these lion-tamers are devoured; until then, obliged to make a secret of their lives, to turn away their eyes from the things on which they would naturally fasten them, to fasten them upon those from which they would naturally turn away, to change the gender of many of the words in their vocabulary, a social constraint, slight in comparison with the inward constraint which their vice, or what is improperly so called, imposes upon them with regard not so much now to others as to themselves, and in such a way that to themselves it does not appear a vice.

Marcel Proust Cities of the Plain
(Sodom et Gomorrhe)
[Vol. 4 of Remembrance of Things Past--
(À la Recherche du temps perdu)]
 
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