Books you loved... until you read them again

Pancake

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I spent hours down a rabbit hole in this Reddit thread

Where the OP shared his experience rereading a series he loved years ago. What followed were so many great stories of people identifying with certain books only to realize later they no longer do. Sometimes it’s the writing itself that isn’t nearly as good as your more mature tastes remember, or the content hasn’t stood the test of time, sometimes even becoming problematic as society changes, and sometimes it’s because once learning more about the author some just couldn’t enjoy their work anymore.

Do you have any experiences like that? Or a favourite book you won’t read again for fear it won’t be as good a second time?

I couldn’t believe how many of the books people named as their long time favourites, the books that made them love reading, were the same as mine. I’m curious if that’s the case in this community as well.

How about the reverse? Books that seem to get better with a second read?
 
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Shiloh Lyric

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I haven't had that experience lately, but I remember years and years ago, my mom and I used to like to read books by Robin Cook. I think the first one I read was Coma. Then several years passed where I didn't read anything by him, went on to other authors like Nora Roberts/JD Robb, etc. Until one day I picked up an old Robin cook book to reread, and realized how very BAD he is at dialogue. It's stilted and always much more formal than even conversation with a casual acquaintance. Even doctors don't talk that way in everyday encounters outside the operating room.

So while the plots are good, characters are mostly developed...I could never again get past the awful dialogue. I don't know if it ever got better because I haven't read one of his books since. :(
 
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Beebo Brink

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The Lord of the Rings is top of my list. I must have read this 3 or 4 times as a teenager, but when I tried to re-read the first volume as an adult (probably somewhere in my 30s), I was horrified by the writing style. It was just block after block of short sentences, a plodding repetitious sentence structure that was serviceable in delivering plot but devoid of any subtlety or elegance.

I was also terribly disappointed in the Dragonriders of Pern, for much the same reason. Anne McCaffrey built this wonderful magical world, such a creative vision, but it was delivered with marginally readable prose and a lack of depth for the human characters. She was one of my favorite writers when I was a teenager, but an adult perspective (especially once I was writing myself) changed my reaction.
 
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Aribeth Zelin

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I once read all of the Thomas Covenant series [well, whatever had been out when I was younger], and I just never liked the main character, and I think I only read them to see if he ever redeemed himself, but he never really did. But, I guess that's not the topic.

A book I really loved that I didn't like so much when I was older. Water Babies; as a child, I didn't really notice the ethnicism and racism for all the magical elements, but while I still enjoyed the magical elements when I read it a few years ago, and could accept that historical backdrop of the problematic parts, it still was just not as enjoyable.
 

Fionalein

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Lord of the Rings looses much upon reading the Simarillion. I now know what those obscure historical references refer to. Much of the wonder is lost now.
 
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Fionalein

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I thought long and I might toss Sun Tzu's Art of War in here... when reading it again I wonder what his message is. There is this whole book that just boils down to "think before you act"... Maybe I'm stupid but I miss spotting it's brilliance.
 
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Kamilah Hauptmann

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I thought long and I might toss Sun Tzu's Art of War in here... when reading it again I wonder what his message is. There is whole book that just boils down to "think before you act"... Maybe I'm stupid but I miss spotting it's brilliance.
Don Quixote was a madcap romp back in it's day, a regular comical Fast and Furious.
 

Jopsy Pendragon

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Anything by Piers Anthony. Prolific pulp that was fun as a teen but I can't get through more than a few pages as an adult without eyeroll eyestrain.
 
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Arilynn

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Read The Fault in Our Stars in one day and was so captivated I immediately went from the last page to the first and reread it that night. And hated it with as much passion as I initially loved it. A few weeks later, I reread it and still hated it. After nearly a year, I reread it yet again and could find the charm and artistry in it.


...This belongs in a confessions thread as it makes me sound bonkers. :ashamed:
 

Ashiri

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I really don't know where to begin but The Hitchhiker's series would be one. There's a lot I have read and on thinking back ...
 

Kara Spengler

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Various YA books I remembered as being much more complex. Some fave authors [Heinlein anyone] who now I can see things in the book I did not see as a kid.